The top 3 reasons why every Advisor should be blogging

In today’s world, it simply isn’t enough to just have a good looking website.  Your website and blog are the online storefront of your business. Blogging can be a marketing tactic to help drive traffic to your website, and provide you with a better online presence. Hubspot reports that small businesses that blog get 55% more website visitors, and 126% higher lead growth than non-blogging businesses.

Below are the top 3 reasons why every Advisor should have a blog:

 1) Your website + blog = More traffic

Adding a blog can help to increase the amount of targeted visitors to your site. A blog article creates a new page on your website.  The more pages and new content that you have, the more chances you have to rank higher in search engine results.  Every time you publish a blog, you create one more opportunity for your site to rank in search results.

 2) Content drives client engagement and leads

92% of business who blogged multiple times a day acquired a customer through their blog (Hubspot State of Inbound Marketing, 2012). A blog helps you to connect and engage with your prospects. It can help you establish yourself as an expert in the industry by answering prospects fundamental questions through sharing high-quality and relevant information. Blogs help draw your prospects in, and gives them a reason to come back.

3) Long-Term Effect

A Blog post doesn’t just stop generating traffic after the day it is published.  Blogs posted today can continue to generate traffic weeks, months, and years after the article is published.

So, there you have it. The top 3 reasons why every Advisor should be blogging to help their business. So what are you waiting for? It’s time to start blogging!


Why Every Financial and Insurance Advisor Needs a Website


As a product manager, I spend around 2-3 full days a week speaking to a multitude of financial advisors whose practices range from independent shops (one person) to large advisory groups and branches. One of the most popular questions I’m asked on a regular basis is the value of having a website. At times, this surprises me because I think the answer to the question is pretty obvious, however, it’s not necessarily something that a lot of us think about because we take the web for granted.

So, do you really need a website? My answer has always been the same answer since I first started developing websites in my early teens: Yes. Undoubtedly yes. Now, whether you have a website that is rich in content, has numerous pages containing videos and a blog is something you need to decide for yourself, but the point I’m trying to make here is that at the very least you need a web presence. This allows your prospects, clients, business partners and maybe even potential investors to learn more about your practice and more importantly, you. All that being said, given significant advances in web technologies over the past decade, it’s simply not enough to just have a presence. It needs to look professional and it needs to look professional on mobile devices. In a study by Fidelity (Millionaires Outlook Survey), more than 44% of millionaires look to the internet when searching for money managers, however, that was in 2011 so the number has surely increased from then. Moreover, given the ubiquity of the web and the proliferation of smartphones, your clients and your prospects will and are already judging you and your business based on how your website looks.

The beautiful thing about the web is that the barriers to entry to get a website up and running are very low. You have the same barriers as any other large financial institution, branch, advisory group or individual would have if they were to launch a website. The same chance at making a good first impression and the same chance at creating a brand and a message that will resonate with the affluent. The bottom line: if you don’t have a website, you’re losing business to your competitors who do and you’re losing that chance at making a good first impression.

However,  there are times when you simply do not need a website. The only time I recommend that you do not have a website, is if your website reflects poorly on your business. After all, would you meet with a prospect in a cluttered and unorganized office? Probably not, because it’s a reflection of how dedicated and serious you are about your business and hence theirs.

Your website is one of the primary assets of your business. It helps create good first impressions. It helps establish your brand, your business philosophy and it helps connect you to your prospects and your clients.

SEO Tips for Advisors | 5 Key SEO Traps You Want to Avoid

I had the privilege of listening to Danny Sullivan speak today and thought I would share and expand on some of his key thoughts with you. For those of you who don’t know Danny Sullivan, he is a well known industry authority on search with over 18 years of experience.

1. No good SEO company will email or call you. This makes complete sense after all, if they’re good at SEO, shouldn’t they first prove that you can find them instead?

2. A guest blogger will not offer you content. That’s right, if you have a blog it’s only logical that you would allow others to write on your blog IF you thought their content was valuable. And it’d be valued if you read their content.

3. You cannot depend solely on Google search for traffic. I actually hear this a lot when working with my clients. It’s all founded on the notion of “if you build it they will come”. Well, they won’t necessarily come, unless you tell them you exist.

4. SEO is only a part of your inbound / content marketing mix. Much like the saying analysis paralysis. Over “SEO-ing” your website will give you negative gains and distracts you from what’s really important. Creating valuable and useful content.

5. (I’m paraphrasing here) Think less about SEO and more about People Engine Optimization (PEO). Search engines were created (and continue to evolve) to achieve one primary goal. To mimic what a human would answer if you asked that human a question. Search engines seek to provide the best answer for the question that is being asked. Both of these actions are performed by humans. Don’t forget that marketing success is derived from the basic concept of effectively answering your customers questions. No amount of SEO can help you do this but listening will.

Have a question about digital marketing? Get in touch with me and ask me anything by filling out this form or by simply emailing me!

How to Manage Dozens of Themes?

In the world of web applications, there is a clear divide between the front-end (client) and the back-end (server); In the last several years, frameworks have emerged for both areas that offer substantial time savings in development and design. Libraries like jQuery, Backbone.js, and Underscore.js make life in the front-end much easier, and technologies like Spring, Hibernate, and Jersey reduce tedious rework and ease integration in the back-end.

It’s only logical that tools would evolve also for creating stylesheets, which can grow to gargantuan sizes in an enterprise portal environment. Enter LESS (and other CSS pre-processors), which provides JavaScript-like functionality to CSS – the ability to define variables, create functions, and nest rules, which results in being able to write better code, faster. In a Liferay portal with dozens of themes, the time savings achieved by using a pre-processor can grow to be substantial.


The attention to the styling of a website can often be eclipsed by the attention to the functional specs; how a website *works* is more important than how a website *looks*. If the styles are ignored for too long, however, especially in a Liferay portal environment with lots of themes, performing edits or upgrades can become hard to manage.

LESS allows for the declaration of variables, which greatly simplifies the reuse of colors, dimensions, and properties. Want to change the entire color palette of the site? Change 2 or 3 variables. Want to add a layout for large, widescreen monitors? Add a single variable and re-use logic for containers and columns. Want to change the size of every piece of text on the site? Define a base font-size and scale all other elements from that.

Variables also allow for consistency between themes – common elements like fonts, banners, and logos can be changed across dozens of themes by altering a single variable.


The use of functions (or mixins) in CSS pre-processors is well-documented; it’s easy to find libraries that will provide multiple vendor prefixes (-moz-, -webkit-, -o-, -ms-) or adjust multiple properties with a single parameter (border-radius, text-shadow). What about a function that will allow you to use different versions of images based on the style of the theme? By passing in parameters like size and color, it’s possible to create themes that are ‘aware’ of their layout and color palette and can provide corresponding images.

Here’s an example of a logo that can adjust its color and width, with a default of 280px:

.logo (@color, @size: 280px){
background:url('../images/logos/example-@{color}-logo-@{size}.png') center center no-repeat;

To use this in a LESS file, this function simply needs to appear along with any other CSS properties:

#my-logo {
.logo("black", 200)

This would output a logo with background image source:


Again, the use of LESS allows for more efficient, more flexible code that reduces rework, enabling common elements between themes that can easily be changed to match the overall aesthetic of the theme.


The benefits of a CSS pre-processor that allows nesting are two-fold. First, it saves time and keystrokes by not having to re-type selectors. For example:

#my-section {
  a {

Is rewritten by LESS into:

#my-section {
#my-section a {

Second, nesting ensures that all of the style definitions have the proper top-level selector. This is especially important in a portal environment, where there is no guarantee that a given class is not in use. From the example above, if ‘#my-section’ contained all of the edits, there is no chance that another, more specific selector (from either the Liferay portal or the browser styles) will take precedence. Avoiding these conflicting CSS rules is a huge time saver and prevents the front-end team from having to play ‘CSS Detective’ more than necessary.

In conclusion, the addition of a CSS pre-processor to any development environment can be a great quality-of-life improvement by increasing the productivity and consistency of the front-end development team while simultaneously decreasing maintenance overhead. When applied to Liferay portal, a pre-processor can assist in ease of re-use between themes and avoiding collisions and overwrites from existing styles.