Financial Advisors: Here’s how to Optimize your LinkedIn Profile in 5 Minutes

According to Linked Into Leads, 9 in 10 Financial Advisors who use social networks turn to LinkedIn as their go-to social media platform. With over 400 million users on LinkedIn, you should focus on connecting with prospects through this giant of a social media platform.

Here are 4 ways to optimize your LinkedIn profile and convert prospects into clients (I’ve used Veriday’s, VP Product Management, Andrew Chung as an example below):


  1. You need a picture of yourself. A great LinkedIn picture is:
  • Clear
  • Professional
  • Eye catching

Financial Advisors: Here's how to Optimize your LinkedIn Profile in 5 Minutes

You want your picture to resemble what you would look like if you were to shake someone’s hand.  Smile and make direct eye contact with the camera so that on an online platform, you mimic that feeling to your audience.

Having an eye catching picture can also increase traffic to your profile. Think of it this way; if you were to search for a Product Manager on LinkedIn and in the search results, had the option of picking between the two pictures below, whose profile would you likely click?

Financial Advisors: Here's how to Optimize your LinkedIn Profile in 5 Minutes


  1. Personalize your LinkedIn URL

This a fast and simple step in optimizing your LinkedIn profile. LinkedIn provides each user with a randomized personal link. Customizing your LinkedIn URL will not only improve your SEO, but it will also look better and more professional.

Financial Advisors: Here's how to Optimize your LinkedIn Profile in 5 Minutes


  1. What does your headline say about you?

Don’t just put your current job title as your headline, that’s already visible on your profile. Write something that encompasses who you are and what you have to offer. In our example, Andrew Chung’s official role at Veriday is VP, Product Management. Yes, that is his current role – but it’s not the whole story about who Andrew is. Instead he markets himself as a Growth-Driven Product Leader, User Experience Practitioner, and Relentlessly Focused on Customer Success.

Financial Advisors: Here's how to Optimize your LinkedIn Profile in 5 Minutes


  1. What contact information have you made available to your connections?

How can people reach you? Including your contact information is critical to further build connections with people on LinkedIn. This provides your connections with a means to contact you outside of LinkedIn, whether it be through a phone number, email, or social media. Being connected on different mediums is great because it allows you to better market yourself to peers, coworkers, and key decision makers in your industry.

Financial Advisors: Here's how to Optimize your LinkedIn Profile in 5 Minutes


LinkedIn gives you the ability to connect with hundreds and thousands of key decision makers, prospects, and future clients. So, take 5 minutes out of your day and optimize your LinkedIn profile.

For a more detailed walk-through on optimizing your LinkedIn profile, check out our Webinar, Powering Up Your LinkedIn Presence for Success, which was hosted by Andrew Chung himself.

Advisors: Increase Brand Awareness with these Twitter Engagement Tips

According to Twitter, there are over 320 million active Twitter users around the globe. In this day and age, having a presence on this giant of a social media platform is crucial to the success of your business. Twitter provides a medium that enables Advisors to connect to their target audience and helps them to reach new prospects.

On average, around 6,000 tweets are Tweeted each second. That’s 500 million tweets per day. People may take notice to your tweets or they may scroll past them…it is all in how you craft your Twitter strategy.

Here are 4 easy ways to better engage your Twitter audience:

  1. picture is worth 1 million characters

90% of information that comes to the brain is visual. If you want people to stopVeriday Twitter Capture scrolling and notice your content – use a visual.

Generally speaking, as an Advisor, you work with numbers. Using graphs is a great way to visually share this type of information with your audience. Statistics show that content with a visual component gets 94% more views than those without (source).

65% of senior marketing executives believe that visual assets (photos, videos and infographics) are core to how their brand story is communicated (source). Images evoke emotional responses to readers, and the use of the right picture can bring out strong emotions and reactions in your readers (happiness, compassion, disgust, or sadness).

It’s important to remember that the majority of readers will scan a page rather than read it word for word.  In a world where people are constantly bombarded with content, one of the most successful ways to capture your audience’s attention, especially the scanners, is through the use of visual assets.

Captivate your audience and allow them to visualize your message through the use of visual assets (example: see tweet to the right).


  1. Use #hashtags

Twitter is famous for its use of hashtags. Although, hashtags may not contribute towards your engagement rate to the extent that you may think. Yes, using hashtags will allow you, as a Financial Advisor, to reach your target audience. And yes, hashtags help to expand your reach on Twitter. That being said, when it comes to hashtags, less is more. According to a study done by LocoWise, adding too many hashtags to your posts can actually decrease your engagement rate as shown in the table below.

  0 # 1 # 2 # 3 # 4 #
% of tweets with the corresponding number of hashtags 55.8 24.45 15 3.13 1.62
Engagement rate 1.9 1.84 1.2 0.4 0.19

As a Financial Advisor, hashtags also allow you to see what is trending, what questions or challenges your audience is having, as well as new technology or information that is relevant to your field. Some popular hashtags in the Financial Services industry include:

  • #FinServ
  • #Advisors
  • #FinPlan
  1. Tweet, tweet, tweet!

Set goals for your Twitter account that focus on how often you post per day or week. A great way to stay on track is to schedule your tweets using a social media management system such as Hootsuite. The more you tweet about topics relevant to the financial industry, the more of the right attention you will get – but be sure you are sharing valuable and unique content, and not just posting for the sake of posting.

Also, people like to see that you are engaged on Twitter. If you see an interesting article that you want to share with others – retweet it! This will help you build relationships with other users. Staying in the loop with current news and trends shows your audience that you are ahead of the curve.

Millennials are the next investors, and more importantly your future clients. This means that tailoring your marketing strategy to their habits should be a priority. An easy way to stay on top of Twitter is to set aside 15 minutes per day to schedule your tweets.


  1. Join in with discussions

The beauty of Twitter is that you can interact with as many people as you’d like.

This is where the @ sign comes into play. This is one of the most important influencers of engagement on Twitter. This feature allows you to directly communicate with other users on Twitter by answering your @ replies and tagging others when you comment or share their content. Over time, this will allow you to build relationships with your audience, and more importantly with your influencers.

Industry influencers, on social media, are some of the most trusted sources of information. Do some research and find out who your influencers are. Connecting with these influencers will help to increase your reach, credibility and overall social media image.

Joining discussions will keep you in the loop of what your prospects and clients are saying and what questions they’re asking. For Advisors, joining in on discussions and sharing useful content can help you to become a thought leader in the industry. People will start coming to you for answers and insights because you have built trust with them.


Gaining insight on what your prospects and clients are interested in or what is challenging them is also a great source for new content ideas. Learning from your audience will enable you to post unique content that is aimed at solving and educating them on their greatest financial challenges.


7 Financial Marketing Trends in the Wealth Management Sector

A Daily 10 Minute LinkedIn Checklist for Advisors


LinkedIn is a community of business professionals with over 330 million active users; making it the world’s largest professional network. Of LinkedIn’s users, 40% check it daily.

If you don’t have a LinkedIn profile, of course it is not too late to establish a presence but I would consider doing it sooner rather than later. Most likely your competitors have already done so and have begun establishing themselves as thought leaders as well as generating leads in the process. If you haven’t read our post on 5 Quick Ways to Optimize Advisor’s LinkedIn Profiles, check it out first before moving on to this one.

Like other social networks, success on LinkedIn requires that you be present regularly. The Digital FA has provided a quick 10 minutes a day LinkedIn Checklist below for Financial Advisors:

Respond to Messages: Check your LinkedIn inbox just as you do email. Be professional and timely in your responses and make sure your replies are meaningful.   

Share Content: Share links to articles or videos to educate, inform, and empower your connections.

Invite Others to Connect: Invite people you have met to connect with you. Personalize your invitation with a brief message mentioning how you met or reflect on a discussion you had. Avoid using the canned default message for invitations.

Engage: Scan posts made by your connections. If you see something you like, let them know. You don’t need to make a comment every time; give a “like” to their update. Doing so will show you are interested in what others have to say.

See Who Your Connections Are Connecting With: This is a great opportunity to search for potential clients, centers of influence, or other people you want to connect with. Ask your connection to introduce you.

Take Action: LinkedIn provides a great feature that allows you to see when your connections are promoted, leave a company, or were mentioned in the news. Congratulate them on their success and take it a step further by sending a handwritten note. Human interaction still remains valuable.

This is a great checklist to keep your profile up to date and engaging. If you follow this daily checklist, you are sure to increase engagement with your audience and make more connections over time.


How are you engaging followers on LinkedIn? Share your comments below.

Social Media Compliance Guidelines for Financial Advisors

This post was authored by Marie Swift and originally appeared here on GuideVine.


Do you know how to think through and manage endorsements and comments on websites and pages under your control?

One piece of SEC guidance that got a big cheer from Financial Advisors and industry social media advocates is that “community” or “fan” pages — if established by an independent third-party to gather community or public sentiment — do not violate the testimonial rule. That just makes sense: if the Advisor has no control over the commentary and posts on the discussion forum, how could he or she be held liable for any comments about services and/or products provided?

For an in-depth look at what Financial Advisors can and can’t do on third-party review sites such as Yelp, Angie’s List, Wallet Hub and GuideVine, click here: Making Sense of the SEC’s Third-Party Review Site Rules

What is important to remember is this: where the Advisor can control the comments, he or she should take great pains not to allow any type of forbidden endorsement or testimonial to occur.

So when thinking about LinkedIn, Facebook, blogs and other website pages you can control, here are some areas to consider.


LinkedIn’s “endorsements” feature on an Advisor’s profile page IS in control of the Advisor. In addition, the endorsement feature provides only positive feedback. With these factors in mind, and because LinkedIn members have the discretion to accept or deny any endorsement, many compliance experts recommend that Advisors turn off this feature. If you and your compliance officer determine that turning off the endorsements feature is a good idea, log in to LinkedIn and click “edit Profile” then “edit Skills and Expertise”. If you already have endorsements on your LinkedIn profile, rather than deleting them, it might be best to simply “Hide” them (who knows – you might not be with the same firm in the future and could potentially show them at some point).

One financial services digital media expert provides some interesting food for thought on her Wired Advisor blog:

“It is my opinion that the social proof gained from showcasing LinkedIn endorsements from your connections on your profile is important, especially since you generally can’t publish recommendations or testimonials,” says Stephanie Sammons, founder of “Also, specific clients and prospects are not identified here. It also should be noted that in the SEC policy update, they no longer view non-investment related commentary to be deemed as a testimonial. Therefore it sounds like you can potentially showcase recommendations that relate to community service or religious affiliation (these were the two examples given by the SEC in the update).”

“Given that the term ‘endorsement’ doesn’t actually indicate within the context of the LinkedIn profile a specific testimonial or recommendation, I believe they are very similar to a collection of Facebook fan page ‘likes’. There are no clients or prospects being singled out through these LinkedIn endorsements. This is mentioned in the SEC update as something that would be a violation of the testimonial rule,” Sammons continues.

“These are aggregate endorsements of your skills from any and all of your LinkedIn connections. With this in mind, I would advise that your list of skills remain very general in nature as they relate to your services such as ‘financial planning’, ‘retirement planning’.  None of your skills listed should indicate or point toward performance results,” she concludes.


Similar to endorsements, LinkedIn’s “recommendations” feature is something a LinkedIn member can control. An Advisor has the ability to accept or deny those types of testimonial comments, most of which are usually independently volunteered.

On LinkedIn (as well as blogs and community forums where the Advisor can turn off the comments feature), most compliance officers typically encourage the Advisor to stay on the safe side and decline to publish (or hide) any comments that could be deemed a testimonial. Many say is it not worth risking any debate as to whether or not the Advisor allowed all comments — both positive and negative – to be seen on the site. Although Sammons observations above do seem to make sense: there may be some gray area if (1) specific clients and prospects are not identified (2) the comments are not investment related. So check with your compliance office or outside legal counsel to get their advice.

On Facebook pages that an Advisory firm controls, many compliance officers are asking Advisors to turn off the Star Ratings feature. To do that, go to the “About” page and find “Page Info” then “Address / Edit”. Deselect “Show map, check-ins and star ratings.”

Some additional pointers:

  • Non-investment related commentary, such as comments on religious affiliation, personal character, or community involvement, are not a violation of the rule, so it is up to you and your compliance officer to determine where to draw the line.
  • On an Advisor’s social media page or profile, there should not be distinctions between who is a client and who are friends or other connections — so be careful not to have a Twitter list or a Facebook photo album called “clients”. There should be no implication that the contacts/friends have experienced favorable results from the Advisor’s services.
  • While the SEC guidance does say that interactive posts made on social sites do not need to be pre-approved, some more conservative firms hold to the requirement that all content on social media needs to be pre-approved before it is published.
  • Map out your social media strategy — both from a compliance aspect, as well as a “voice” and “editorial” standpoint before stepping in to the social media waters. Social media and online forums are a great way to “be discoverable” and advance worthwhile causes and educational information. Having a written strategy in place is the best way to go. It will keep you on track if you are doing your own social media and becomes especially important if you ever hand the reins to a marketing manager or social media director.


Its not just a compliance issue though. Commenting on blogs or photos or Facebook articles is an opportunity for anyone with a good or bad opinion to express those thoughts freely. Many who post do not even consider the reputational consequences of their posts, but smart Financial Advisors and service professional know that every word they post on social media sites can either tear down or build up reputational capital.

Smart Advisors will think twice before posting content on any site, especially when they have had a drink, are tired, stressed or experiencing a sense of exhilaration (any of these situations could skew one’s otherwise judgment). It is important to show some personality from time to time, but doing it in a thoughtful “brand essence” way will pay dividends down the road. For more on “voice”, “authenticity” and “brand essence,” read Finding Your Voice Online and Building Your Brand as a Financial Advisor Today.

What if you feel you’ve been slandered online? While not every site will remove upsetting comments, Facebook may be open to removing egregious content. Facebook page owners can report violations to Facebook’s administrative team using Facebook’s “Report a Violation” page. Read more on eHow

LinkedIn and Lead Generation: Does it Work?


This post was authored by Kristen Harad and originally appeared here on GuideVine.

Financial Advisors often hope for the “magic bullet” when it comes to marketing. What is the easiest way to make my phone ring? If that sounds like something you ask yourself frequently, then you may quickly dismiss LinkedIn as a lead generation tool. While you won’t attract too many leads directly from LinkedIn, this social platform can be a powerful way for you to showcase your expertise and relevancy to your target audience which, when done well, can assist in attracting leads.

Here are 4 LinkedIn “Musts” to make the most of this platform:

1. You Must Be Present to Win  

LinkedIn is synonymous with Professionals.  As a professional, you’re expected to be here.

When my mother-in-law, a self-employed nutrition coach recently joined at age sixty-nine, any question mark about whether LinkedIn reached mainstream status faded in my mind. LInkedIn is a “must have” marketing channel. No longer cutting edge or hip, it’s just part of the program.

Whether or not prospective clients originate from LinkedIn, they will include a review of your profile in their due diligence.  You can leverage this opportunity and make a positive impression.  If you’re not on LinkedIn, that potential client will move down his list.

2. Think About Your Target Client in Your Profile

How can you help your prospect identify if you’re the right person for them? Yes, you must complete your profile which LinkedIn helps you through step-by-step.  You also want to build out a Company Page. (Keep in mind, it’s best to lead your Company Page with a clear, easy-to-understand, and relatable description of who your clients are and how you help them.  Include a video message or training to stand out and make it easy for your visitor to understand and connect with you.

3. Be a Thought Leader

You should already have your foundation marketing platform for which you create regular content. This written or video blog reaches a limited number of people if it exists only on your web site. Even the most prominent bloggers, like Michael Kitces from Nerd’s Eye View, realize that publishing content without promotion does not work.  LinkedIn is one of the many channels where you can push out your content, widen your reach and solidify your expert status.

Here’s how to get the most our of LInkedIn:

  • Join groups where your target audience participates.  Usually Advisors find themselves in Financial Advisor groups:  the CFP Board ® Group, NAPFA, or the FPA to name a few. While helpful for business support, you want to engage in groups where you can educate and hear from your potential clients.
  • Be a valuable contributor and people will pay attention to you.
    • Every time you post to your blog, share your content with your LinkedIn Groups.
    • Listen and give feedback.  Take time each week to engage in conversation in the groups, outwardly helping others and commenting on their content.
  • Link back to your site when you answer questions.  As long as you have your site optimized for lead capture (with a call-to-action and a sign-up form, you’ll be able to provide relevant responses while also building your list.

4. You Must Connect with Your Clients

LinkedIn sends out push notifications when people change jobs, receive promotions, or achieve other professional milestones.  You can keeps tabs on what’s up in your clients’ life by connecting with them on LinkedIn.  (Plus, you will be able to keep your clients up-to-date with your latest content).  When you present in their mind, they’re more likely to make the important introduction when a colleague, friend,or relative inquires for a referral.

Remember, if you expect potential clients to view your LinkedIn profile, then navigate to your site, and sign up for a consultation all in one visit, you will be disappointed.  But when you recognize that LinkedIn helps you get your self-branded content in front of your audience faster, serves as a viable way to stand out from the competition, and continually reminds your clients of your value, you will soon see the power of this professional platform.


How to Optimize Your LinkedIn Profile

How Advisors Can Market To The Millennial Generation: Part 2

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A Millennial weighing in on how to market to Millennials.

In Part 1 of this series, we became better acquainted with the buying and browsing habits of Millennials. In part 2, we will take a look at one of the ways in which Advisors can reach this tech-savvy generation. As with each generation (and being a Millennial myself) this group comes with their own set of interests, expectations, and abilities.


Millennials are known to be constantly checking their Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter accounts.  Our generation has become so attached to our smartphones that when we have to put our phone away for an hour, we don’t know what to do with ourselves.   The average Millennial checks his or her smartphone 43 times and spends 5.4 hours on social media per day. Some would say we are a Marketer’s dream – always plugged in.

So, what are Advisors to do?

Look beyond the traditional marketing strategies and utilize what the Millennial generation has invented. Millennials are the inventors of Social Media and it has quickly become their link to the outside world, far more then even television. It is not going anywhere; so creating a great online reputation on Social Media will only help to build a future with these Millennial clients.

When it comes to marketing and education, Advisors who want to reach this generation will need to embrace Social Media; but benefiting from this avenue is all about knowing how to use it effectively. A great strategy is all about mastering communicating in the language of the Millennial.  Advisors can do this by creating content that is centered around their values and goals.  Most are getting married and buying houses later in life, and a small percentage have started saving for retirement. As a Financial advisor, your topic is wealth and management.  However, you can place your expertise in the context of what Millennials value.

So, what do Millennials value and where are they dishing out the dollars these days? Jeff Yang (CNN, 2014) suggests that Millennials are much more likely to spend their money on things and experiences that they can share with friends; such as a nice dinner out, a weekend road-trip, or a one-of-a-kind experience. They tend to spend their money on creating memories and experiences, rather than owning big and expensive materials.  In Yang’s article, he discusses the top 3 things that Millennials are spending their money on:

  1. Travel. Millennials travel more then any other group, taking on average 9 leisure trips a year.
  2. Technology. Millennials are redeploying their spending from televisions to mobile devices. 45% of twenty something year olds say it is important to them to have the latest features or styles in smartphones. They don’t see this as just a gadget but as the primary way they connect with friends, family, and the outside world (social media).
  3. Training.  Millennials are one of the most well educated generations and are spending more on education then prior generations. The average millennial graduates with a $30,000 student loan burden.

As an Advisor trying to connect with a Millennial, why not share your expertise through the currency that they value (experiences, travel, concerts, food, digital media, education) and through the medium that they communicate (social media). Although you are an Advisor, and your expertise is in finance, wealth and management, position your Social Media strategy in the context of what this generation values most based on their spending habits.  Create and share content on your Social Media platforms that speak about how to save for a vacation, or school, or point out the experiences that they may miss out on if they don’t manage their money effectively. Below are some examples of some great topics that would tie together both your expertise and Millennials interests:

  • Creative ways to save for a vacation
  • How to save money while travelling
  • Should you invest or pay off student loans?
  • Strategies to dig yourself out of student loan debt
  • 10 tips to save money for leisure activities
  • How saving can fuel your travel bug

Advisors: Establish a presence on the avenues that Millennials are spending the most time on, and tailor your created and curated content to information and insights that are relevant to us, without being overly commercial. First, understand and speak to the values that drive Millennials.  Second, understand their lifestyles and experiences and find ways to amplify their reality.  Millennials can be a difficult yet rewarding demographic for Advisors.


How to Drive Sales Using the Customer Buyer Journey

4 Keys to The Practice of Content Marketing

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In a recent webinar I delivered, I briefly touched on the 4 keys that we use at Digital Agent for content marketing that helps balance time and investments to ensure we create positive marketing results! Here they are again in case you missed our webinar:

Balance Content Creation and Curation

Did you know that original authored content statistically has a HIGHER ROI? According to the Custom Content Council, 2/3 of consumers say that information provided through custom media helps them make better decisions and more than half of consumers are willing to BUY from companies that PROVIDE custom media! Spending too much time curating content and sharing articles with your audience and not enough time generating your own content at a regular tempo is having adverse affects on your marketing. Simply being visible on social media by curating and sharing third party content can impact the results of your efforts. Why? Well, in short, you’re directing your audience’s traffic to other people’s thought leadership content. While you may be demonstrating awareness of your industry, the simple fact remains that you are losing traffic with an audience who may be very engaged with your content. Any content marketing strategy MUST first start with a content creation strategy no matter what the frequency, as long as it’s consistent. As you ramp up your content marketing efforts, consider placing a slightly higher focus on the creation of content. You might be surprised at the results of your own writing.

Created Content is Yours

Ok, I’ve made the case to balance content creation and curation but in case you’re still not convinced, here’s another point to consider. Always remember that created content is Yours and Your voice is unique. No one else has the unique life or work experience that you’ve encountered. No one has the exact same opinions, perspectives or advice as you do. Creating content will differentiate you from your peers (in addition to a good value proposition). And best of all, you can distribute it as many times as you want through as many mediums you desire with as much frequency as your audience will tolerate! Also, it’s completely FREE!

Curating Content with Prejudice and Care

Every content marketing strategy must eventually have a curation component to it. It is obviously impossible to create great content every single day of week especially if you have limited time and resources. Curating content will help support your thought leadership position and it will compliment a creation strategy. Think of it like the accessories you might add to your smartphone (like a case to protect it) or the ottoman that matches your couch. When you share content it helps to show your audience that you have awareness of your industry, as it relates to your practice and business. It also has a branding and positioning effect. Sharing content about retirement planning, savings and strategies would suggest that you have knowledge of this subject and could also suggest that your business specializes in this area. But (there’s always a ‘but’), avoid blindly sharing content. Avoid just pushing content that you haven’t read into your social media accounts and most of all, avoid just sharing a link with no opinion or commentary and be selective with the articles you curate. Sharing badly written content or content that doesn’t reflect the “tone” of your brand will have your audience disengage.

Create and Share H.U.G.G.E.R. Content!

Ok, you’re probably wondering what I mean by HUGGER. Yes, it’s an original acronym created by yours truly. It stands for:

  • H: Helpful
  • U: Useful
  • G: Genuine
  • G: Giving
  • E: Educational
  • R: Relevant

Creating and sharing HUGGER content that helps solve your audience’s greatest challenges and helps them achieve their life, career, health, financial (and the list goes on) goals has a positive effect on building credibility, trust and loyalty with clients and prospects. Credibility, trust and loyalty are the obvious essentials to building strong relationships and a growing business.

Are you using content marketing in your marketing strategy? How do you balance creation and curation?


Guide to Content Marketing

How Financial Advisors Can Use Twitter Analytics To Produce Better Content: Part 2


So, you’ve been publishing content consistently now for a month or more. One technique I’ve used to determine the kind of content our marketing team should be focused on curating is by looking at the engagement of all of our tweets over the course of a 2-3 month time span (honestly, there’s no science behind that number, but after 2 months of data collection, we felt that was a large enough sample size). Here is a step by step guide on how to get the information we use to inform our content strategy. After you log into Twitter Analytics you can choose the time frame for which you would like to view and collect your data.

Twitter analytics - Select time span

  1. Select a 2 or 3 month time range. Be sure to hit the “update” button.
  2. Beside the range “button” there is an “Export Data” button. Click on that button, wait a few seconds, and a spreadsheet will automatically download onto your computer. The name of the file will be tweet_activity_metrics.csv.
  3. Open the spreadsheet with your favourite spreadsheet tool (NOTE: I will be using Microsoft Excel to provide you with the next steps so be sure to use the equivalent features in your spreadsheet tool). There will be a number of different columns preset
  4. Excel Sort Button Sort by Engagements from highest to lowest (if you have no engagements, sort by impressions) and pull out the first 10-15 rows of each.\
    1. Impressions typically indicates the visibility a piece of content receives through a keyword, a hashtag, or perhaps some kind of attribution to another Twitter user.
    2. Engagement indicates to me the content I posted that drove a user to like, share, re-tweet, click, etc. Engagement is a source of truth of the quality of your data. 1000 users can see your tweet, but if no one clicks on it or interacts with it, chances are the content or the words you used were not enough for someone to spend the few seconds to even look at the page.
  5. Examine the Tweets and try to answer the following questions:
    1. Do you notice a trend across the Tweets with respect to a particular topic and subject matter?
      1. Certain subject areas might gain more attention as a result of the audience you have who are following you. Not everything you share is relevant to your audience. Write down the subject areas you feel received the most engagement and ensure you are writing down a single subject area.
      2. Are you listing statistics or quantifiable comparisons or metrics that receive more engagement?
    2. Do you notice certain keywords or brand names across these tweets?
      1. Keywords and brand names peripheral to your practice and business make a lot of sense to share and include in your status updates. Write down those keywords and / or brand names.
    3. Are there certain Twitter user names (e.g. @VeridayHQ) in the tweets?
      1. Writing down the Twitter users who are helping you get engagement is a good way document targets for potential content partnerships and collaboration. This is a well known strategy to help boost your following.
  6. After you’ve completed this exercise, let’s say you have something that looks like this:
    1. Subject matter: Retirement Planning
    2. Subject matter: Tax
    3. Keyword: money
    4. Brand: Google
    5. Twitter user: @VeridayHQ
  7. Now that you have this list, work on sharing a larger portion of your updates (50-60%) focused on this criteria and see it your engagement levels and follower counts increase at a higher rate. Understandably, subject matter may be seasonal depending on the type of industry you’re in, for example, retirement, 401k and RRSPs might be top keywords in and around the January to March time frame so be sure to use your discretion at what keywords are best to use based on the time of year.

Are you using Twitter analytics to inform your content marketing strategy? Need help? Let’s chat!


Infographic: 6 Steps to Nurturing the Sales Funnel Using Social Media


The traditional 20th century sales and marketing funnel has been usurped in the digital age. As we’ve discussed before, there is a new buyer journey where 60% of the sales journey is completed before a buyer makes first contact with a sales person. Customers are lead from awareness to sale often before they even speak to anyone. Social media has played a large part in changing the sales funnel by shortening the gap between people and information, and providing a new way for Advisors to pull in prospects.

The Infographic below, brought to you by TollFreeForwarding, provides social media tactics to move prospects and leads through the sales funnel. This is not to say that we should abandon all other tactics and only use social media to nurture prospects, but rather social media is just one way to to pull prospects through each stage of the sales funnel.

According to the Infographic, 80% of customers expect businesses to be active on social media.  For Advisors active on social media, there are 6 steps to nurturing prospects through the sales funnel:

  1. Awareness
  2. Interest
  3. Conversion
  4. Sales
  5. Loyalty
  6. Advocacy

To learn more about the 6 steps, and some actionable tips for each step, read the full Infographic below:


How do you use social media to move your prospects through the sales funnel? We’d love to hear about techniques that have worked for you.  Comment below. 


How to Drive Sales Using the Customer Buyer Journey

How Financial Advisors Can Use Twitter Analytics To Produce Better Content: Part 1

Much of what I’ve observed in my many years of working with financial advisors from the standpoint of the use of social media has been that they use social media primarily as a publishing platform. In fact, many digital marketers still rely on social media to publish both curated and created content.

One of the questions I’m often asked, however, is “How do I know what kind of content to push and how do I know whether the content I’m publishing is working?”. This is a great question and as a financial advisor, you might like the answer as it requires you to do some basic analysis of social media data.

In part 1, I’ll cover off 3 key data points that you can easily grab through Twitter analytics. So, if you have a Twitter and are actively using it, this article is definitely for you. Before (or after) reading this article, it might be useful to visit and log in with your Twitter handle.

1. Interests

Twitter Unique Interests

Twitter – Unique Interests

Twitter automatically collects information on the interests of your followers. In particular, there is a section under the “Followers” page, that indicates the top 5 “Unique Interests”. Twitter defines these interests as the ones the average twitter user would not otherwise have. Simply put it is “The top interests that distinguish your followers from the Twitter average.” You can use this information to help identify the kind of content you should be publishing. You can use these interests as a guideline for good and relevant content to publish.

2. Location

Twitter Locations Example

Follower Location Demographics

It’s definitely always a good idea to understand the location of your users especially if you’re seeing engagement at odd times of the night. Understanding these details can help increase the amount of engagement you receive from around the globe. This is especially important in cases where you have businesses and clients in different time zones. Scheduling your posts at times when your audience is looking at social posts will increase your engagement and social conversion.

3. Your Followers Also Follow

Twitter Followers also follow

Twitter – Your Followers also follow

This data point is a pretty telling one as it comes to ensuring you have the “right” followers. If you’re primarily using Twitter as a publishing platform for business, this list should contain some, if not all, of your closest competitors. It’s likely the only time you’ll be happy to see your competitors on your list. The reason? It means you’re sharing similar content than that of your competitors and reaching a like audience. Another way you can use this list would also be to perform competitive research to see who else is posting similar content.


Social media (especially Twitter) is one of the easiest and most available platforms to test your content as the feedback occurs in real-time (not a lot of wait time needed) and Twitter performs much of the data collection that you need to make informed decisions about your content.

Are you using Twitter to publish content? What is an other strategy that works for you to determine the kind of content to post?

Need a second opinion on your analytics? I’d love to help. Connect with me