How Financial Advisors Can Use Twitter Analytics To Produce Better Content: Part 1

4 New Features Coming Your Way!

Much of what I’ve observed in my many years of working with financial advisors from the standpoint of the use of social media has been that they use social media primarily as a publishing platform. In fact, many digital marketers still rely on social media to publish both curated and created content.

One of the questions I’m often asked, however, is “How do I know what kind of content to push and how do I know whether the content I’m publishing is working?”. This is a great question and as a financial advisor, you might like the answer as it requires you to do some basic analysis of social media data.

In part 1, I’ll cover off 3 key data points that you can easily grab through Twitter analytics. So, if you have a Twitter and are actively using it, this article is definitely for you. Before (or after) reading this article, it might be useful to visit analytics.twitter.com and log in with your Twitter handle.

1. Interests

Twitter Unique Interests

Twitter – Unique Interests

Twitter automatically collects information on the interests of your followers. In particular, there is a section under the “Followers” page, that indicates the top 5 “Unique Interests”. Twitter defines these interests as the ones the average twitter user would not otherwise have. Simply put it is “The top interests that distinguish your followers from the Twitter average.” You can use this information to help identify the kind of content you should be publishing. You can use these interests as a guideline for good and relevant content to publish.

2. Location

Twitter Locations Example

Follower Location Demographics

It’s definitely always a good idea to understand the location of your users especially if you’re seeing engagement at odd times of the night. Understanding these details can help increase the amount of engagement you receive from around the globe. This is especially important in cases where you have businesses and clients in different time zones. Scheduling your posts at times when your audience is looking at social posts will increase your engagement and social conversion.

3. Your Followers Also Follow

Twitter Followers also follow

Twitter – Your Followers also follow

This data point is a pretty telling one as it comes to ensuring you have the “right” followers. If you’re primarily using Twitter as a publishing platform for business, this list should contain some, if not all, of your closest competitors. It’s likely the only time you’ll be happy to see your competitors on your list. The reason? It means you’re sharing similar content than that of your competitors and reaching a like audience. Another way you can use this list would also be to perform competitive research to see who else is posting similar content.

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Social media (especially Twitter) is one of the easiest and most available platforms to test your content as the feedback occurs in real-time (not a lot of wait time needed) and Twitter performs much of the data collection that you need to make informed decisions about your content.

Are you using Twitter to publish content? What is an other strategy that works for you to determine the kind of content to post?

Need a second opinion on your analytics? I’d love to help. Connect with me andrew.chung@veriday.com

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